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Articles in _3 Positive Organizations

Individual Differences at Work: Part 2, Type A and Type B
By Sarah Tottle  
April 5, 2016 – 12:10 pm | 3 Comments

Ever since Friedman and Roseman’s 1959 study identifying the Type A personality and its link to coronary heart disease, research into the influence of personality factors on health has caught public attention.
Type A …

Happiness from Within and Without
By Jeremy McCarthy  
January 19, 2016 – 11:28 am | 2 Comments

These researchers ask, “Whose responsibility is happiness?” It does not rest solely on the individual, and it does not emerge solely from the conditions of society. The researchers suggest co-responsibility as the answer: “The idea that happiness emerges as a collective and cooperative endeavor that requires both favorable life conditions and individual effort.”

How to Be a Positive Leader: Small Actions, Big Impact (Book Review)
By Kathryn Britton  
July 30, 2014 – 1:08 am | 3 Comments

I highly recommend this book as a source of ideas for enhancing your leadership skills, whether you lead yourself or thousands of people. The many stories of positive outcomes will help you see that you can make a difference by making small changes. Want ideas for your small change? There are more than 70 strategies and practices clearly labeled throughout the book.

Beer and Philosophy: Engagement Japanese Style
By Bridget Grenville-Cleave  
January 7, 2013 – 11:49 am | 14 Comments
Beer and Cherry Blossom

According to several news reports, what Inamori did to re-engage employees and lead Japanese Airlines back into the black was to insist on compulsory philosophy sessions for all staff, washed down with free beer. I was so intrigued by this story that I wanted to delve a bit deeper. I hoped Kazuo Inamori’s business philosophy might yield some positive psychology gems like the ones I recently found with Honda.

Kim Cameron’s Deviance Continuum
By Amanda Horne  
October 3, 2012 – 7:24 pm | 4 Comments
Balancing Sunlight

In Kim Cameron’s Deviance Continuum, designed for use in businesses and other organizations, normality or healthy performance is a mid-point between positively deviant and negatively deviant performance. Negative and positive deviance are aberrations from normal functioning, problematic at one end and virtuous at the other.

Boost Success and Passion: Tell a Better Story
By Christine Duvivier  
May 11, 2012 – 10:39 am | 6 Comments

Most of us don’t realize that we have a few central narratives running through our lives because the stories we tell ourselves are so familiar that we don’t even realize they are stories. In my work with clients, I’ve found that it’s often not the events of life that allow or prevent success in love, work, and happiness. It’s the stories we tell ourselves — and we can change our stories.

Why the Workplace Needs Positive Psychology
By Orin Davis  
March 6, 2012 – 9:28 am | 25 Comments

With increasing demands in the workplace and a greater need for knowledge-based work, innovation, and creativity, organizations need to find ways to enable their employees to do and be their best. Positive psychology can show those in management roles how to use and develop human capital. It can also guide organizational policy and enable workers to make their best contributions. Positive psychology has been, and will continue to be, a boon to the workplace.

Changing Behavior in Schools (Book review)
By Bridget Grenville-Cleave  
October 26, 2011 – 9:36 am | 2 Comments

I was very excited to be asked to review Sue Roffey’s latest book. Previously a teacher, Roffey is now an educational psychologist, consultant, and writer. The book’s aim is to go beyond what teaching manuals usually do, which is to provide ways to manage poor pupil behavior so that it doesn’t disrupt other students’ learning. This book also provides the strategies to foster positive pupil behavior.

Does it matter whether you live in Hope or in Hell*?
By Bridget Grenville-Cleave  
November 26, 2010 – 9:52 am | 11 Comments
Does it matter whether you live in Hope or in Hell*?

Do people who live in different cities really have different psychological traits and dispositions? Few psychologists have studied variation across cities before now, and those that do focus on negatives such as obesity, psychiatric disorders, and violent crime. So this new positive psychology research into city-level strengths by Nansook Park and Chris Peterson is not only interesting, but also very refreshing. As they point out, it’s high time we looked at what’s right with city life!

How Physical Activity Enhances Productivity
By Marie-Josée Shaar  
May 24, 2010 – 9:22 am | 10 Comments
How Physical Activity Enhances Productivity

There has been a lot of press about health, fitness, and obesity lately. It seems like everywhere we turn, there are new stats telling us why we need to pay serious attention. …

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