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Articles in Strengths

Open-Mindedness: Too Little, Too Much, Just Right
By Sandy Lewis  
May 25, 2015 – 2:19 pm | 3 Comments
Opinionated

When Open-Mindedness is used well, people can be extraordinarily adept at problem solving and able to make critical decisions clearly and with solid reasoning. They can be excellent leaders who bring objectivity to situations that might otherwise be ambiguous or highly slanted. But this strength can also be underused, leading to snap judgments, or overused, leading to decision paralysis. How do we use it to just the right degree?

Virtual Conference on Self-Confidence Starting Today – May 11
By Editor K.H.B.  
May 11, 2015 – 10:47 am | No Comment
 

Starting today: a virtual conference titled Banish Self-Doubt with the New Science of Self Confidence. You are invited to hear
Louisa Jewell host a series of interviews with experts on building confidence, courage, grit, and self-efficacy.

The Price of Critical Thinking
By Homaira Kabir  
May 7, 2015 – 8:52 am | 6 Comments
Fashion event

Yes, I could rest assured that they will not be gullible in life. But this thought did not reassure me. Instead, something gnawed at my heart. Something murmured its disquiet.

Signature Strengths: Translating Research into Practice
By Ryan Niemiec  
April 30, 2015 – 3:29 pm | 2 Comments
Treadmill by Kevin Gillespie

In practice, people find it surprisingly challenging to come up with new ways to use their signature strengths. Perhaps that’s because we often use our signature strengths without much awareness. For example, have you paid much attention to your use of self-regulation as you brush your teeth? Your level of prudence or kindness while driving?

Here are three tips for using your signature strengths in mindful ways.

What Do We Know about Signature Strengths?
By Ryan Niemiec  
April 28, 2015 – 11:36 am | 4 Comments
Strengths lens

If you have only one question to ask someone about their character strengths, make it, “What strengths are most essential to who you are and define you as a person?

Can The Arts Contribute to Health Promotion?
By Marie-Josée Shaar  
April 15, 2015 – 11:38 am | No Comment
Oil Painting

The arts have inspired us for centuries. Think of the emotion you still feel when you hear the song you associate with your first kiss or remember the play that made you laugh to tears. The arts add much richness to life. Yet, they are practically absent from work places.

Let’s explore what the arts can contribute to our work lives and to good health.

Life After Chocolate: Romance Over the Long Haul
By Donald Officer  
April 13, 2015 – 5:26 am | No Comment
 

Love Sense is indeed about romantic love as popularly defined. More specifically the book targets prospects for “happy ever after.” According to Johnson’s clinical experience, despite inevitable conflicts or setbacks, true long range love is no fairy tale. This book is also about the many other forms of strong attachment because the author believes the roots of all human affection are essentially the same.

The Many Faces of Authenticity
By Homaira Kabir  
April 9, 2015 – 1:06 pm | No Comment
Distorted reflection

I am learning to appreciate the distinctiveness of each self and the flexibility with which one transitions into another. I may not get an Academy Award for my acting. But in the coming together of my multiple selves, I’ve begun to discover the wholeness of being.

Contemplation in Practice
By Jan Stanley  
April 2, 2015 – 10:10 am | 3 Comments
Wild geese

Now I turn my attention to the practice side of the International Symposium on Contemplative Studies. Here’s a practice that I experienced at the conference and how it affected my well-being. I include step-by-step instructions for trying it out at home.

Promises of Contemplative Science: Creating a Caring Society
By Jan Stanley  
March 30, 2015 – 11:30 am | 2 Comments
Mind & Life Logo

Of the 470 presenters at ISCS, none had a message more compelling than that of Tania Singer, a social neuroscientist from The Max Planck Institute. Singer seems vitally alive as she presents her work, a scientist who has clearly found her calling and is excited to share her findings. She is also studying a neglected type of motivation, Affiliation Motivation. Like many others there, she is embarked on the quest described by the Dalai Lama in the closing speech, “How can we take knowledge from science and apply it in the service of humanity?”

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