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Articles in Decision-Making

Positive Psychology Toolkit Update (Sponsored)
By Seph Fontane Pennock  
March 22, 2017 – 1:12 pm | One Comment

Early in my career I had learned that if you want your product or service to be successful, all you have to do is (ask and) listen and act on what you hear, or don’t hear. We asked. You all spoke. We acted on your suggestions, bringing you Positive Psychology Toolkit 2.0. We also added a community forum so that all of our toolkit users could request new tools and interact with each other.

Saving the Best for Last?
By Robert Rosales  
August 19, 2016 – 10:21 am | 8 Comments

I confess I have not always been a fan of saving the best for last. I certainly would have failed the famous marshmallow test. With time, I have come to recognize and value this conventional wisdom in practice. In sports, in business, or in our relationships, the winners are declared only at the end.

Never Split the Difference! (Watermark Event with Chris Voss)
By Editor S.M.  
July 21, 2016 – 4:30 pm | One Comment

What should you write in an email if you want a response within minutes?

Why is it a good strategy to get your negotiation counterpart to say “No”?

The Limits of Pursuing the Best
By Sherif Arafa  
July 14, 2015 – 10:17 am | 3 Comments

“Always pursue the best in everything!”

You have surely heard this advice from a friend or from a motivational speaker. You may have even found it logical advice that deserves observance.

Yet is it really sound advice? Is it beneficial as a persistent life style?

Open-Mindedness: Too Little, Too Much, Just Right
By Sandy Lewis  
May 25, 2015 – 2:19 pm | 7 Comments

When Open-Mindedness is used well, people can be extraordinarily adept at problem solving and able to make critical decisions clearly and with solid reasoning. They can be excellent leaders who bring objectivity to situations that might otherwise be ambiguous or highly slanted. But this strength can also be underused, leading to snap judgments, or overused, leading to decision paralysis. How do we use it to just the right degree?

Motivational Focus
By Amanda Horne  
February 3, 2015 – 10:39 am | One Comment
Quiet energy

I want to add to Lisa’s review of the book Focus by discussing prevention and promotion focus. Both kinds of focus can sometimes work together. For example, with the goal to exercise more, promotion-focus gives people enthusiasm for the gain of better fitness, and prevention-focus keeps them vigilant in the long term to avoid losing the fitness they built up.

Designing Happiness for 2015
By Bridget Grenville-Cleave  
December 26, 2014 – 4:23 pm | 6 Comments

From Paul Dolan’s talk about his new book, Happiness by Design, I gained 3 important insights to shape my thinking about happiness in the new year.

Mastering the Art of Quitting (Book Review)
By Donald Officer  
December 4, 2014 – 11:30 am | One Comment

In Mastering the Art of Quitting, Peg Streep and Alan Bernstein unpack systematically and skillfully what it means to quit from public myth to personal consequence. Nobody wants to be known as a quitter, yet we live in an unpredictable world where the capacity to move on with agility and minimal regret can be a huge advantage. 

Perspective: Giving Up When You Can’t Cut The Mustard
By Daniel Tomasulo  
October 9, 2014 – 4:12 am | 5 Comments

What do you say when your dissertation advisor suggests it’s time to open a hot dog stand?

Positive Psychology & the Illusion of Free Will
By Sherif Arafa  
June 27, 2014 – 8:01 am | 8 Comments

Positive Psychology focuses on many constructs that are related to the idea of freedom. Sonja Lyubomirsky found that about 40% of the variation in happiness across a population is attributable to intentional activities rather than genetic or environmental factors. Isn’t she talking about making free decisions?

If freedom is that important, how can we reconcile Positive Psychology with studies that appear to undermine free will?

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