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#CharacterDay on March 20: Film Premiere of The Science of Character
By Tiffany Schlain  
March 20, 2014 – 9:24 am | No Comment
Film Premiere today

Today is #CharacterDay, the premiere of an 8-minute film that explores the social science and neuroscience behind character development and how we can shape who we are. Find out how to view the film and participate in the events going on today.

5 Minutes to Feeling More Loved, Valued, Peaceful, and Connected
By Christine Duvivier  
February 14, 2014 – 9:35 am | 4 Comments
Photo of Birds Taking Off

When they want to feel more loved, valued, respected or connected, most people give away their power. They ask (or want) others to be different, which means someone else’s behavior determines how happy they will be.
What do happier people do?

Other Lenses on Strengths
By Bridget Grenville-Cleave  
February 4, 2014 – 9:41 am | No Comment
New Lenses on Experience

What can you do to help people understand the strengths of others? How can you help them learn how to use different strengths as lenses to see things from different points of view? Here’s one fabulous technique, adapted from Michelle C. Louis to enable people to do just that. At the same time, it strengthens relationships.

The Psychology of Spas and Wellbeing (Book Review)
By Emiliya Zhivotovskaya  
July 25, 2012 – 3:15 pm | 24 Comments
 

The Psychology of Spas and Wellbeing by Jeremy McCarthy offers a clearly stated, scientific investigation of the mind-body connection and the psychology of relaxation, beauty, touch, and holistic wellness.

Boost Success and Passion: Tell a Better Story
By Christine Duvivier  
May 11, 2012 – 10:39 am | 6 Comments
Spring planting lessons... Sowing seeds

Most of us don’t realize that we have a few central narratives running through our lives because the stories we tell ourselves are so familiar that we don’t even realize they are stories. In my work with clients, I’ve found that it’s often not the events of life that allow or prevent success in love, work, and happiness. It’s the stories we tell ourselves — and we can change our stories.

Positive Psychology: A Practical Guide (Book Review)
By Kathryn Britton  
April 2, 2012 – 9:45 am | 5 Comments
Book cover

Bridget Grenville-Cleave’s new book is distinctly small, not much bigger than the size of my hand and lighter than a medium-sized sandwich. That may seem like a strange way to start a review. But a book that is lighter than a sandwich can go anywhere with me. So now that we’ve established that it’s an easy companion, what does it bring along? This is a book for people who want to put positive psychology to work in their own lives, or those of family members, clients, or colleagues.

All Pleasures Are Not Created Equal
By Bridget Grenville-Cleave  
March 2, 2012 – 7:30 am | 3 Comments
Walking dogs AND a view

In various models of well-being, positive emotions seem to have less gravitas than other factors. One reason may be that they are often equated with hedonic pleasure. So it was with great curiosity that I stumbled across a philosophical approach to pleasure that suggests that there is more to the hedonic life than initially meets the eye.

Savoring the Festive Spirit
By Bridget Grenville-Cleave  
December 23, 2011 – 11:06 am | 10 Comments
Winter frost

The holiday season and the New Year can be pretty stressful, but this time of year provides us with some ideal opportunities for savoring – noticing, appreciating, and enhancing the things which are already positive in our lives – and there is nothing easier to do. The rules of savoring are simple to follow, and you don’t need any special skills or equipment. In fact anyone, young or old, rich or poor, can learn how to savor and reap the benefits.

Positive, Negative, or Mindful?
By Amanda Horne  
December 6, 2011 – 11:25 am | 6 Comments
IMG_1937

“Isn’t there a place in which we’re not positive or negative, but we’re neutral and objective?” This comment was made recently by a member of team in a discussion about how emotions, reactions, and behaviors impact team conversations and team relationships. This comment led to a broader discussion of how individuals can apply mindfulness practices to be less reactive and more constructive in workplace interactions.

Positive Psychology: Fit for Purpose?
By Bridget Grenville-Cleave  
November 30, 2011 – 11:47 am | 34 Comments
Cutting your cloth

Should positive psychologists be concerned that recent research based on expressing gratitude not only didn’t do the study participants any good, it actually lowered their self-esteem? What can we learn from this about fitness for purpose?

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